Sign Research Foundation Releases Typography Executive Summary

“Typography, Placemaking and Signs,” the four-part white paper series originally released by the Sign Research Foundation (SRF) in 2014, is now available, free of charge, in a four-page executive summary. Written by the Fashion Institute of Technology’s Craig Berger, and produced by SRF, the paper includes: The History of Typography and Place; Environmental Typography Best Practices; […]

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Penn State to Present Lighting Study at 2017 National Planning Conference

Penn State University’s Philip Garvey, the Senior Research Associate at the university’s Larson Transportation Institute, will be a featured speaker at the American Planning Association’s 2017 National Planning Conference. His session, entitled “A Guide to National Sign-Illumination Standards,” will be presented on Saturday May 6 at 2:30. He will be joined by his colleague, Jennie […]

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Penn State Study Examines Font Legibility

The Larson Transportation Institute at Penn State University conducted a study on font legibility through a grant from Gemini Inc. (Cannon Falls, MN), a manufacturer of dimensional letters. The following is the Executive Summary from the report. For information about the full report, contact Philip Garvey at pmg4@psu.edu. Background and objectives The enormous font selection […]

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Villanova Study Examines Value of Illuminated On-premise Signs

Professor Charles R. Taylor,  a marketing professor at Villanova University, and a Research Fellow at the Center for Marketing and Policy Research, conducted a survey of business owners as to the value of illumination for their on-premise signs. Surveys were sent to 750 business owners, and 333 useable responses were received. Here are some of […]

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Where Can I Find a Model Sign Code?

Several model sign codes have been published, and many can be viewed in their entirety. Here are a few of them. From The Sign Research Foundation http://www.signresearch.org/research-sign-codes/ From the United States Sign Council http://www.usscfoundation.org/USSCModelOn-PremiseSignCode.pdf From the International Sign Association https://www.signs.org/Portals/0/PDF/pdf2016/Model_Sign_Code_Legal_Tech_Exploration_On-Premise_Sign_Regs.pdf

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Duke University Economic Professor Applies “Game Theory” to Signage

David McAdams, an economics professor at Duke University, has authored a paper entitled “The Economics of On-Premise Signs” in conjunction with the United States Sign Council. In it, he contrasts the philosophies and ramifications of sign codes in Henrietta and Brighton, New York — two communities with similar demographics, both of which are near Rochester, […]

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How Big Do the Letters on Signs, Parallel to the Road, Need to Be?

As noted elsewhere on this website, “visual acuity” and “conspicuity” and “cone of vision” are very important for signs, because motorists must be able to detect signs, read them and then react to them in a few seconds. So how much does the visibility change when a sign directly faces the driver (perpendicular to the […]

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Texas A&M Study Shows No Correlation Between EMCs and Traffic Accidents

In 2012, Texas A&M University’s Texas Transportation Institute conducted a study to see if electronic message centers (EMCs) cause traffic accidents. Research included data from the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) own Highway Safety Information System (HSIS), a comprehensive database of traffic-accident records from several states. Researchers identified 135 cites in which EMCs had recently been […]

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What Does “Conspicuity” Mean for Signage?

Conspicuity for signage is determined by the contrast between the sign and its background. A sign must be conspicuous first, because, without it, the sign’s legibility and readability are moot points. While the appropriate size for signs is addressed on this website under the heading “How big should a sign’s letters be?”, conspicuity includes factors […]

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Penn State Study Provides Optimum Lighting Levels

Illuminating signs, including electronic message centers (EMCs), at inappropriate lighting levels hurts everyone. If the LEDs that light the sign aren’t bright enough, then the sign won’t be legible at night, and the sign loses its nocturnal value. The energy used to light the sign is wasted. Conversely, if the LEDs are lit too brightly, […]

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